Front page & Index Current U.S. Class: 2/319; 2/322; 24/17AP; 24/578.1; 24/DIG43
Shirt-waist retainer and conformer.
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.
FLORENCE E. THOMPSON, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

SHIRT-WAIST RETAINER AND CONFORMER.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 721,253, dated February 24, 1903.
Application filed May 24,1902. Serial No. 108,832. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, FLORENCE E. THOMPSON, of Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Shirt-Waist Retainers and Conformers; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, which form part of this specification.

This invention is an improved shirt-waist conformer or shaper and skirt-supporter; and its objects are to provide a simple easily-adjusted device for holding ladies' shirt-waists properly around the waist and for giving to the fronts thereof the "elongated" or V contour now so popular, and this is accomplished by means of a resilient metallic band light. and thin enough to be comfortable and readily conformable to the waist of the wearer and which when its ends are connected, as hereinafter explained, will naturally assume and maintain the V shape desired without employing any extra parts or extensions for this purpose.   This band can be also provided with adjustable pin-slides, by which the shirt-waist can be securely fastened thereto at any desired point, and the band may also be used as a skirt-supporter, if desired, by providing the skirt-waistband with hooks which can be caught over the band intermediate the slides thereon, or a separate skirt-supporting band of heavier material can be employed, if desired.   The invention is very light and simple, yet positive in conformation when fastened, and it can. be easily connected to a shirt waist or body before the latter is put on and removed and put on therewith at the pleasure of the wearer.

The accompanying drawings illustrate a simple embodiment of the invention, and I refer to the claims for concise summaries of the material features thereof for which protectection is claimed.

In said drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view illustrating the device in use.   Fig. 2 is a similar view thereof detached from waist and skirt, showing the band fastened in full lines and open in dotted lines.   Fig. 3 is a detail view of the band-fastening, partly in section.   Fig. 4 is an enlarged section through one of the slides, and Fig. 5 a detail of a slight modification of the band.   Fig. 6 is a detail.

The device comprises a band 1, preferably made of thin steel, on one end of which is secured a flat loop 2; the opening in which is in the same plane as the width of the band and extends transversely, not longitudinally, of the band.   This opening is large enough to permit the opposite end 3 of the band to be slipped there through.   The end 3 of the band is provided with a series of backwardly-pointing notches or serrations 3' on its upper edge, so that when the end 3 is slipped through loop 2 the natural resiliency of the band will cause one of the notches 3' to engage the corner of the loop, as shown in Fig. 2, and fasten the band; and by pushing end 3 more or less through the loop the belt can be fitted more or less tightly.

The band 1 is preferably made of thin steel and normally will assume and maintain a straight form, and when placed around the waist it is necessary to partly twist or bend the front ends of the belt to enable end 3 to be engaged with loop 2, and the natural resiliency of the belt causes these parts to lock when engaged, this locking being facilitated by the expansive pressure on the band by the waist of the wearer.

Owing to the bend or twist of the band 1 necessary to engage ends 2 and 3, as described, the band when fastened naturally assumes the shape shown in Figs. 1 and 2; the connected ends pointing down in V shape, thus imparting the desired fashionable form to the shirt-waist front.

I consider the peculiar manner of fastening the ends of band whereby the V shape is naturally obtained one of the important features of my invention, and it is not essential thereto that the band be made of one integral piece of metal.

In some cases the band might be made of several pieces suitably connected--as shown in Fig. 5, for example--so as to allow longitudinal adjustability of the band, while yet sufficiently rigid to insure its ends naturally assuming the V shape when they are connected as above described.

In Fig. 5 the band is composed of two parts B and C, having their adjoining ends overlapped and slidably connected by clips a, part A having a catch a' adapted to engage one of the slits b in part B, so as to lock the parts when adjusted.

Upon the band 1 are slipped a series of adjustable slides 4, each provided with a suitable shirt-waist engaging and retaining device, safety-pins 4' being shown attached to the slides. The wearer can fasten these slides to the shirt-waist at the desired points previous to putting it on and can adjust the slides suitably upon the band before fastening the latter. In this way the shirt-waist can be held down in place at any desired points around the band and waist of the wearer.

When used as a skirt-support, the skirt-band is provided with hooks 5, which can be caught over the band, as shown. The invention therefore is useful as a shirt-waist retainer, a shirtwaistconformer or shaper, and as a skirt-supporter.

Having thus described my invention, what I therefore claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent thereon, is--

1. A shirt-waist retainer and conformer, comprising a metallic band having a loop at one end in the plane of the width of the band, and extending transversely thereof, the other end of the band being flat and adapted to be passed through the loop to thereby impart a V shape to the waist, substantially as described.

2. A shirt-waist retainer and conformer comprising a band having a transverse loop at one end in the plane of the width of the band, and its other end serrated on its upper edge, and adapted when passed through the loon to lock therein and impart a V shape to the front of band, substantially as described.

3. A shirt-waist retainer and conformer, comprising a metallic band having a transverse loop at one end in the plane of the width of the band, and its other end flattened and adapted to be passed through the loop and locked thereto, thereby imparting a V shape to the waist, adjustable slides on the band, and waist- engaging devices on said slides, substantially as described.

4. A shirt-waist retainer and conformer comprising a baud having a transverse loop at one end in the plane of the width of the band, and its other end serrated on its upper edge, and adapted when passed through the loop to lock therein and impart a V shape to the front of the band, a plurality of slides on the band, and waist-engaging devices attached to the slides, substantially as described.

5. The herein-described shirt-waist conformer, consisting of a band of flat spring metal having serrations on one edge near one end thereof, and a transverse flat loop at the other end of the band lying in the plane of the width of the band and adapted when transfixed by the serrated end of the band to impart a Vshape to the shirt-waist, substantially as described.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own I affix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

            FLORENCE E. THOMPSON.

Witnesses:
    AGNES V. LANDER,
    CLARA W. DRENK.