Front page & Index
= U. S. Patent no. 515,302 Current U.S. Class: 450/114; 2/321; 2/338; 450/154
N°15,684     A.D 1891
Date of Application, 16th Sept., 1891
Complete Specification Left, 96th July, 1892--Accepted, 16th Dec., 1892

PROVISIONAL SPECIFICATION.

Improved Ladies' Waist Belts, Corsets, or equivalent Garments
or articles.

  I, WILLIAM LOUIS DE NORMANVILLE, of 6, Clarendon Crescent, Leamington,
in the County of Warwick, Civil Engineer, do hereby declare the nature of this
invention to be as follows :--
 
  The main object and effect of this invention is to provide waist belts, corsets, or
similar garments or articles so constructed that when applied they control the form
of the figure or waist, or in other words cause an alteration in the form of the
figure or waist, reducing it at the points desired, which in most cases will be at the
sides, whilst allowing its expansion if required at those points where the extra
size is not of so much moment or so perceptible, the circumference remaining, if
desired, approximately the same.

  Under this invention a belt or corset is so made that when applied it reduces the
waist at the sides or in transverse diameter and thereby changes a figure or waist
which is not round into one that approximately is so. Such a belt or corset is
so made that when it is applied and fastened it imparts local pressure upon
the sides of the waist, viz., at the diameter to be reduced in such a manner that it
effects the end sought without necessarily further constricting the waist generally.
A belt under this invention may, in one form, consist of metallic or equivalent
springs running horizontally round a portion of the waist and coupled together by
pliable or soft material, the spring parts being adapted to lie at the sides of the
waist and to exert local and graduated pressure thereon whereby the figure may
be made approximately round or of other desired form.   The springs themselves
may be graduated in strength, being lighter at the ends and stronger in the
centre portion and in some cases the springs may have curved ends or be curved
throughout.

  In another form the belt would be made substantially wholly of an elastic
metallic or other equivalent band so formed as to exert the local pressure specified
and buckled or fastened together at the ends.

  In another form the belt would be made partly of rigid, or approximately rigid
bars, plates, or strips, at those parts where the local pressure is to be exerted and
partly of pliable or soft material.

  In a further form the belt would consist of two or more rigid curved bars,
plates, or strips hinged together and so formed and adapted as to impart the
requisite local pressure at the sides of the waist or figure and produce the form of
figure desired.

  In another modification the belt may be made of a bar, plate or strip (or a
plurality of same) made in a single length and adapted to be sprung onto the waist
or figure.

  The metallic strips, plates, bars, or springs herein referred to may be made of
any desired thickness and may be plain fluted or corrugated or otherwise suitably
formed so as to impart stiffness to them. They may also in some cases be used in
single pieces whilst in others they may be applied in multiple one above another.
In other cases they may be made wider at one part than at another, or thicker there
or built up.

  When the strips, plates, bars or springs are connected together by pliable soft
parts they may in some cases have a special curvature at their ends to avoid the
formation of angles at the junction of one material with another when fitted to the
waist or figure.

  Belts or other garments or articles having or made of two or more parts may in


some cases be buckled or fastened both at back and front to adjust them and to
fasten them.

  Corsets according to this invention are provided with the metal (or other
equivalent) strips, plates, bars or springs horizontally, or substantially horizontally
or equivalently introduced, and so formed and proportioned, in strength as when
applied to the figure to distribute the inward pressure unequally, that is a greater
pressure would be exerted at the sides or locally than at other places whereby the
required formation of figure would be produced.
  In the. case of corsets, bodices, or equivalent garments a belt of any of the forms
specified may be attached to, introduced into, or combined with such ; or the strips,
plates, bars or springs may be attached to, worked into, or combined with such in
any desired manner ; or they may be mounted on suitable material so that they
can be attached to corsets bodices or equivalent garments by the wearer as an outer
cover or inner lining or otherwise as desired.
  The horizontal plates, bars, springs or strips may have extensions or projections
on each side above and below to extend their bearing surface, such extensions or
projections being of suitable form, strength, and elasticity. Or, the horizontal
strips, plates, bars or springs may be otherwise attached to or combined with the
usual vertical "bones " or strips in any suitable manner.
  It is to be understood that by my invention it is not necessary to reduce the
circumference of the waist to produce an apparent diminution of the waist and
figure in its transverse diameter which is the one to which it is principally desired to
give a pleasing appearance ; for by the invention the appearance of a smaller waist
may be attained without reduction of the waist measurement or circumference and
consequently without discomfort or injury to the wearer.
  Under this invention belts, corsets, bodices, or other garments may have the
parts arranged and combined differently according to requirements or to particular
kinds of such garments provided with the improvements ; and also such parts may
be made in different forms, sizes, and strengths and disposed in different ways
without departing from the characteristics or features of the invention.
  Dated the 15th day of September 1891.

CHEESBROUGH & ROYSTON,
  15, Water Street, Liverpool, Chartered Patent Agents.

COMPLETE SPECIFICATION.

  Improved Ladies' Waist Belts, Corsets, or equivalent Garments
or articles.

  I, WILLIAM LOUIS DE NORMANVILLE of 6 Clarendon Crescent Leamington,
in the County of Warwick, Civil Engineer, do hereby declare the nature of this
invention and in what manner the same is to be performed, to be particularly
described and ascertained in and by the following statement:--

  The main object and effect of this invention is to provide waist belts, corsets, or
similar garments or articles so constructed. than when applied they control the
form of the figure or waist, or in other words, cause an alteration in the form
of the figure or waist, reducing it at the points desired, namely, at the sides,
whilst allowing its expansion if required at those points where the extra size is
not of so much moment or so perceptible, namely, at the front and back, the cir-
cumference remaining, if desired, approximately the same.

  Under this invention a belt or corset is se made that when applied it reduces
the waist at the sides or in transverse diameter and thereby changes, a figure or
waist which is not round into one that approximately is so.   Such a belt or corset
is so made that when applied and fastened it imparts local pressure upon the sides
of the waist, viz., at the diameter to be reduced in such a manner that it effects the
end sought without necessarily further constricting the waist generally.

  A belt under this invention may in one form consist of metallic or equivalent

springs running horizontally round a portion of the waist and coupled together by
pliable or soft material, the spring parts being adapted to lie at the sides of the
waist and to exert local and graduated pressure thereon whereby the figure may
be made approximately round. The springs themselves may be graduated in
strength, being lighter at the ends and stronger in the centre portion, and in some
cases the springs may have curved ends or be curved throughout.

  In another form the belt would be made substantially wholly of an elastic
metallic, or other equivalent band, so formed as to exert the local pressure specified
and buckled or fastened together at the ends.

  In another form the belt would be made partly of rigid, or approximately rigid
bars, plates or strips, at those parts where the local pressure is to be exerted and
partly of pliable or soft material.

  In a further form the belt would consist of two or more rigid curved bars,
plates, or strips hinged together and so formed and adapted as to impart the
requisite local pressure at the sides of the waist or figure and produce the form of
figure desired.

  In another modification the belt may be made of a bar, plate or strip (or a
plurality of same) made in a single length and adapted to be sprung on to the waist
or figure.

  The metallic strips, plates, bars, or springs herein referred to may be made of
any desired thickness and may be plain, fluted or corrugated, or otherwise suitably
formed so as to impart stiffness to them.   They may also in some cases be used in
single pieces whilst in others they may be applied in multiple one above another.
In other cases they may be made wider tat one part than at another, or thicker
i there, or be built up.

  When the strips, plates, bars or springs are connected together by pliable or
soft parts, they may in some cases have a special curvature at their ends to avoid
the formation of angles at the junction of one material with another when fitted to
the waist or figure.

  Belts or other articles or garments having, or made of, two or more parts may in
some cases be buckled or fastened both at back and front to adjust them and to
fasten them.

  Corsets according to this invention are provided with the metal (or other
equivalent) strips, plates, bars or springs horizontally, or substantially horizontally
or equivalently introduced, and so formed and proportioned in strength as when
applied to the figure to distribute the inward pressure unequally, that is a greater
pressure would be exerted at the sides or locally than at other places whereby the
required formation of figure would be produced.

  In the case of corsets, bodices, or equivalent garments a belt of any of the forms
specified may be attached to, introduced into, or combined with such; or the strips,
plates, bars or springs may be attached to, worked into, or combined with such in
any desired manner ; or they may be mounted on suitable material so that they
can be attached to corsets, bodices or equivalent garments by the wearer as an outer
cover or inner lining, or otherwise as desired.



  The horizontal plates, bars, springs or strips may have extensions or projections
on each side above and below to extend their bearing surface, such extensions or
projections being of suitable form, strength, and elasticity. Or, the horizontal
strips, plates, bars or springs may be attached to or otherwise combined with the
usual vertical " bones " or strips in any suitable manner.

  It is to be understood that by my invention it is not necessary to reduce the cir-
cumference of the waist to produce a diminution of the waist and figure in its
transverse diameter, which is the one to which it is desired to give an improved and
more pleasing appearance ; for by the invention the appearance of a smaller waist
may be attained without reduction of the waist measurement or circumference and
consequently without discomfort or injury to the wearer.

  In the drawings which serve to illustrate my invention I shew several forms or



modifications thereunder, by which the effect herein -specified is produced.   The
same letters and figures of reference are used throughout the views of the drawings
to denote the same, like, or equivalent parts wherever they occur.

Figure 1
  Figure 1 is a plan illustrating diagrammatically a waist belt according to this
invention, and the effect produced thereby ; and Figure 2 is a view, that is a plan,
of a similar belt by itself, with its ends fastened.

Figure 2
  In Figure 1, a designates the metallic portions of the waist belt; n represents
diagrammatically the form of the figure at the waist produced by ordinary belts or
corsets (which I call the "natural " form), that is approximately an ellipse; and
o represents diagrammatically the form of the figure produced by the application of
the belt, that is circular, or approximating to a circle. These three letters a, n and o,
are used throughout the drawings to denote those parts or things which they are
used to represent in the above figures.

  The parts a shewn in Figure 1 consist of flat or slightly curved springs of steel,
or other suitable material, of' convenient width and thickness; for instance the
width may be about 1" (one inch), whilst the thickness at the centre may be from
about 20 to 25 imperial wire gauge, if made of spring steel, the strength however
being a matter of personal taste according to the amount of reduction or alteration
of the figure needed or desired.

  It will be observed in this figure, that the springs a are straight and tapered
down from the centre towards both ends, the object of which is to obtain stiffness
or the greatest strength in the centre, that is at the parts which are required to
press with greatest pressure upon the sides of the waist, to give the desired local
compression and reduction.

  At the ends of the springs a, I provide bands b, two of which are provided with
ordinary buckles c, through which the free ends of the others are passed; whereby
tension is put upon the belt by the wearer and it is brought up to the figure.

  The bands b may be made of leather, woven web, or suitable textile or other
material, and may cover entirely the metallic parts a, or go outside or inside same,
from end to end, and be sewn or otherwise suitably fastened thereto; or they may
be fastened to each end of the metallic parts instead of being continuous.

  On drawing the belt together round the waist, the ends of the springs a will be
drawn towards each other, back and front; till they assume a curved form, and
together with the other parts of the belt, lie closely against the body: By the
construction and form of the springs in their natural condition, it will be evident, as
already stated, that the tendency of the springs is to press locally with the greatest
pressure on each side of the waist, and that this pressure decreases gradually
towards the back and front.   In other words when the belt is on, the tendency of
the springs is to straighten themselves, and the part of the springs about which the
movement would take place, if freed, being the centre, where they rest upon the
sides of the waist, a constant localised pressure is being brought upon the sides, and
thereby they are locally contracted and the width of the waist reduced, extension
taking place front and back.   The transverse diameter is thereby reduced, whilst
the front to back diameter is increased, so that the waist approximates the more
pleasing circular form without reduction of the circumference, and without incon-
venience or injury to the wearer.

  These belts are usually fastened on over the ordinary corsets, and thereby the
localised pressure thereon not only reduces the transverse diameter of the waist
at the parts where the springs lie (that is for a vertical distance equal to the depth of
the springs), but transmits the circumferentially localised pressure vertically through ;
the "bones" of the corset, thereby obtaining a graduated localised pressure on each
side of the waist starting from the maximum at the smallest part of the waist, and
diminishing upwards and downwards, and resulting in an approximately circular
form at the waist and a graceful and pleasing expansion upwards and downwards
therefrom.

The front and back buckles are provided to allow the springs to be adjusted to

their best positions for different waists. Thereafter the back one may be left
buckled permanently.

Figure 10 Figure 11
Figure 12
  The parts or springs a in Figures 1 and 2 may be of the same width throughout
but thickest in the centre, and tapering away, as shewn, towards both ends.   Or
they may be of the same thickness throughout and reduced towards the ends in
width, or in quantity of metal or other material in any other suitable way (such fox
instance as in the manner set forth with reference to Figures 10, 11 and 12, herein-
after described); in fact it is not of much moment what particular form or con.
struction the springs take, so long as the end. specified is obtained, namely, the
greatest strength provided in the centre parts, diminishing towards the extremities.
This of course applies to cases in which the parts a are in the form of springs.

  As stated above, Figure 2 shews a belt similar to that in Figure 1, in its natural
form (i.e. off the waist) when drawn up to and buckled together at a point about
which it would reach if applied to the waist circumference, that is, its circumference
as fastened is equal to that of the waist shewn in Figure 1. There is, however, in
this belt, a slight modification as to form; viz., the extremities of the springs a are
slightly turned inwards.   This construction is provided in order to prevent the
extremities or points of the springs from standing away from the figure and
producing corners or an irregularity of form in the waist.

This feature may be applied in any case where it may be deemed desirable or
necessary, whether the parts a be of spring construction or rigid, as hereinafter
described, and whether curved or straight.

Figure 3
Referring now to Figure 3, the belt shewn therein is constructed with rigid or
approximately rigid metallic parts a a, the same effect however being produced as
by the springs shewn in Figures l and 2. In this case, the rigid metallic parts a a
are formed to a curvature of larger radius than that of the "natural" curve at the
sides of the waist.   For example, this curve may approximate to, but preferably be
of rather larger radius than the circular curve o, corresponding to the waist
measurement, to allow for any slight bending.   In the figure this radius is
designated a', whilst the radius of the curve of the sides of the waist is designated n',
and that of the circular curve o'.

  When this belt is applied to the waist, the pliable textile or other bands b of the
belt are drawn up together as set forth with reference to Figure 1, and the rigid
metallic pieces a are thereby drawn towards each other, with the result that local
pressure is applied at the sides of the waist, that is in the direction of the largest
diameter, and this diameter is reduced, whilst the smaller diameter; that is that
through the front and back, is increased, and the circular form or curve repre-
sented by o is approximated, the rigid pieces a a lying or fitting closely on the sides
of the corset without protuberance or inconvenience of any kind.

As a general statement of the nature of this invention it may be stated that a
person's figure, by the application of this invention, is transformed more or less
by the pressure thereby brought to bear on the figure, from one of the form of an
ellipse produced by ordinary belts or corsets (as represented by n), to one of a more
agreeable appearance, namely, that of a true circle (as represented by o), reducing
the width of the waist (that is the diameter from side to side), and thereby
improving the figure without reducing the circumference, and without causing
inconvenience or injury to the wearer.

Figure 4
Figure 5
  In the modification shewn in Figure 4 the belt is made out of a continuous piece
of steel spring, fastened together at its ends by the stud c fitting into apertures c1
in the other end of the belt. A belt of this description is made with the parts
which are required to press with greatest pressure upon the sides of the waist, and
which are adapted to bring about the effect specified, stronger than the other parts.
In Figure 4 the additional strength is shewn as produced by thickening the sides.
In Figure 5 a belt of this character is shewn extended in a straight line in
which the parts (i.e. at the sides of the waist) which are required to exert the
greatest or local pressure, are made deeper than the others, in lieu of being thicker,

as in Figure 4, but the. belt is of the same thickness throughout.   If the belt
shewn in Figure 5 be made of spring steel it may be of the thickness above men
tioned, and the depth at the stiffer or stronger parts may be one inch, and the other
parts (that is those which come at the front and back of the waist) narrower, say
half an inch, more or less.   But the required extra strength of the side parts a
may be obtained and graduated by any of the constructions or formations herein
described, or by any suitable means.   When the ends of such a belt are fastened
together the greater resistance of the parts n to bending causes the belt to assume,
when off the waist, a form or curvature substantially as shewn.   A belt of equal
strength of material throughout its length but curved to the form shewn before
tempering will give similar effects.

  Reverting to Figure 4, the form of the "natural" figure, and that produced by
this invention, represented by the ellipse a and circle o, are shewn herein, as in
Figures 1 to 3; whilst. the belt is shewn in the; form it takes when buckled, and off
the. waist. When applied and fastened with the fastening in front, i.e. with the
major axis of the elliptical belt running from front to back or at right angles to
the major axis of the ellipse n, its sides bring local pressure upon the sides of the
waist and transform it more or less into the. circular form o, which form also
the belt itself takes ; and the constant local pressure by which the circular form
of waist is produced is retained; and without inconvenience or discomfort, as the
circumference of the waist is not. reduced by it. The form of waist produced
(approximately circular) is a "compromise ". between the effort of the figure to
expand laterally, and the effort of the. belt to contract laterally and expand towards
the front and back.

Figure 6
  The modification shewn in Figure 6 consists of a belt made of two approximately
semi-circular rigid; or practically rigid, pieces a a, hinged together at a2, say
at the back of the figure, and fastened at the front by the stud c on one half,
and fitting in or passing through the aperture c' in the other half a.   In this
case then the belt is practically, rigid, and is of the farm, when fastened, of that
of the figure to be produced, viz., circular, and it must be of the circumference
of the circle o to be produced. The natural form of the figure in this case,
as in others, as represented by the line n, is elliptical ; and the effect of the
rigid belt when applied over the ordinary corsets, as in other cases, is to reduce
the width of the waist by the local pressure which the centre portions of the
parts a will bring upon the ends of the ellipse, that is, the sides of the waist, and
to extend it in the opposite direction (without reducing the circumference) into. the
circular form o.

Preferably, the halves of a belt of this form would be made of a larger curve
than the theoretical circle to be produced, as it would be advantageous and desirable
to allow for some elasticity and bending in order that they may be made of as thin
metal as possible, since to make them actually rigid would necessitate the use of
metal of inconvenient thickness.
Figure 7
  The belt shown in Figure 7 is composed of metal strips with pliable fastening
parts b, but in this case the metal which must be spring metal, such as steel, or
rolled brass, is of equal section throughout, and is formed of a graduated curve, as
Shown, towards the ends; the central part being straight or nearly so (or even
convex to the figure). The curve of the ends gradually approaches in form the
theoretic circular curve o to be produced from the natural figure (represented by
the ellipse n); of course in this case as in others the local pressure on the sides of
the waist (viz:; across the larger diameter of n) is brought to bear or applied by
this straight or convex part; that is central part, of the springs a a.
Figure 8
  The application of the invention to corsets, or bodices with vertical bones; is
illustrated in Figure 8, this figure being a cross section of the smallest part of the
corset; and showing the metallic parts a according to this invention.   The metallic
parts a in this case consist of springs having the greatest strength in the centre,
and diminishing in: strength towards each end, and the corsets are shown in the form

they would give to the figure when on and fixed, whilst the form of the "natural"
figure produced by corsets without my invention applied, that is, without the
parts a, is represented by the ellipse n.

  It is to be understood, however, that other forms or constructions of the parts a,
such as herein specified, may be used in corsets in lieu of spring pieces such as just
specified.

  The spring pieces a shewn are arranged with the central and stronger parts
outside those vertical " bones " e of the corset E which rest upon the sides of the
waist, and to which the local pressure is to be imparted or applied, whilst the ends
of the springs a are best taken through the garment under the front and back
"bones" e'.   These " bones," then, hold down the ends of the metal springs or
parts a which tend to spring out, whilst the vertical side bones distribute the
pressure of the central parts of the springs over a large area, so that not only is
the local pressure exerted upon the parts covered by the springs a, but it is dis
tributed a considerable distance up and down at the sides of the corset, and effects
thereby a localised, and at the same time graduated, reduction of the side diameter
of the waist, in the manner herein specified.

  In this figure, f represents the textile material of the corsets by which the bones e'
and springs a are retained, while g are the ordinary front and back busks of the
corset or garment.

  The parts a, whether elastic or rigid, as herein described, may be fastened in the
corsets as shewn in the figure, by sewing them in, or otherwise, and if desired, in
some cases, they may be riveted or otherwise connected to the vertical "bones" e
or e', or both; or they may be in some cases contained in textile coverings, and
with 'these coverings fastened in or to the corsets as described.

Figure 10 Figure 11
  The springs or pieces a, whether for belts or corsets or other garments, may
be made strong by making them fluted or, corrugated in form, as shewn in cross
section in Figures 10 and 11. In such cases the fluting or corrugation may be
gradually the in depth from the centre to near both ends, by which con-
struction the stiffness or strength thereof is gradnated, the object and effect of
which is hereinbefore stated.

  The section of metallic belt pieces a shewn in Figure 10 may also be used
in connection with rigid belts, such as those set forth with reference to Figure 3
and Figure 6, as well as to spring belts, for the purpose of preventing the
edges from chafing or becoming uncomfortable to the wearer. To some forms of
figure this point or feature may be important, as, for instance, for short waisted
persons.

Figure 12
Figure 13
  As regards stiffness or strength, however, this may be obtained and graduated in
different ways. The most simple is that of graduating the thickness of metal as in:
Figure 1, and that in Figure 12, in which the metal spring part a is shewn built up
of several superimposed pieces of spring metal, of different lengths.   Or again, the
width may be graduated, the thickness being constant as shewn in Figures 13, 14:
Or again, the effective pressure exerted may be graduated by forming the parts a
to   different or graduated curvatures, such as shewn in Figure 7.
  In Figures 12 and 13 the ends of the pieces a are left of full width, this is done
to avoid pointed ends and possible penetration of the belt or clothes thereby.

Figure 14
  In Figure 14 the triangular spaces marked h are formed in the springs a by
cutting out triangular pieces of this form, thereby reducing the effective width and
strength.

Figure 15
  In Figure 15, the springs or stiffening pieces a are shewn used in multiple.   This
construction is suitable for application to broad belts, in or to which the parts a
may be sewn or otherwise fastened.   In such case the springs would preferably be
narrow, say from 1/4 to 1/2 inch wide, placed one. above the other as shewn.   This form
would allow the belt to conform more to the vertical curve of the figure and in some
cases tend to give greater ease of movement to the wearer.   These parts a when.
arranged in multiple may be graduated, or be of differential lengths, and strengths,
to graduate the pressure thereof at different parts, up and down, of the figure, or

otherwise modified to produce the effects herein specified. All forms of the parts a
herein shewn may be made up in multiple in a belt such as that just described; and
it may be here stated that all the different forms of springs or rigid pieces a herein
set forth or referred to may be used in belts or corsets according to this invention,
as may be found or deemed desirable, or necessary.

Figure 9
  In Figure 9 is shewn a vertical front elevation of a body with a belt according
to this invention applied: The full lines o at the waist represent the width of the
waist as produced by the belt, which is assumed to be applied over the ordinary
corset, whilst the "natural" figure as produced by an ordinary corset without my
improvements is represented by the dotted lines n.

  My figure improving belts may be used or worn either under or over the outer
dress, and the parts a made of any suitable material in lieu of metal; and they may
be combined with bodices or with corsets or other garments or fastened thereto or
thereupon in any convenient or desired manner, which necessarily will differ according
to the different conditions of the application of the invention, and to special require
ments. Or again, they (the parts a) may be inserted or enclosed in the material of
such garments.

  In such cases the waist part of such garment itself supplies the means of applying
the metallic parts a a, that is it serves in lieu of the pliable portions b b above
described.

 In the case of the application of the invention to corsets, the springs or metallic
pieces a may be applied under or over the vertical bones, and be made secure in
place by sewing through perforations, or by any usual . means. They may be
manufactured separately for additions to corsets, for which purpose they may be
provided with perforations -for sewing them in place, or they may be covered in
textile or other material affording a means of sewing them on.

  In some cases if in multiple as in Figure 15, and covered as described, they may
farm an; inner lining, or outer patch, or cover, of the, corset, to be sewn on by the
wearer.

  As regards the effect of the use of this invention, and the form of an ordinary
figure as constricted by ordinary corsets or belts, the curve of the waist produced
thereby (and which for convenience I call the " natural " curve) is approximately
in the form of an ellipse, as represented in the drawings by n; that is to say, this is
the :common form, and has a greater diameter from side to side than from front to
back.. Now the transverse diameter of the waist (i.e. from side to side) is more
subject to observation than its diameter from front to back, and it is well understood
that a waist of circular form having the same circumference as one in the form of an
ellipse, with the greater diameter from side to side, appears smaller and gives the
figure a more pleasing appearance and effect, and this my invention produces, as it
reduces this transverse or side to side diameter of the waist, and without any, or
without undue, reduction of the circumference, causing it generally to be transformed
from the form of the " natural " curve, namely, approximately an ellipse, as
produced by the ordinary corsets or belts, to approximately a truly circular form.
A reduction of 1/2" or 3/4" in transverse diameter is very easily produced by my invention,
an inerease in the front to back diameter taking place at the same time, so that the
circumference remains unchanged, and no inconvenient or injurious effect is produced
upon the wearer. Tightening the ordinary belt or corset, on the other hand, would
reduce the front to back diameter at the same time, so that a reduction of 1" in the
transverse diameter would probably not be obtained in most persons without a
reduction of about 2 inches in circumference. Such a reduction upon a person's
usual waist measurement when wearing ordinary corsets, would generally be
impracticable, and certainly injurious.

  Having now particularly described and ascertained the nature of this inven-
tion and in what manner the same is to be performed, I declare that what I
claim in respect of the herein described invention is:--

  1. Ladies' waist belts, corsets, or equivalent garments or articles substantially as

herein described, that is to say, waist belts, corsets, or equivalent garments or
articles adapted to be put on or applied to the waist or figure by drawing or
buckling same up, or by hooking, or otherwise applying same, and so formed of
or provided with horizontally arranged elastic or rigid (or approximately rigid)
strips or plates, that when put on or applied to the waist or figure they exert local
inward pressure at the sides of the waist, reducing thereby the transverse diameter
or width of the waist, and without necessarily reducing the circumference thereof;
for the purposes and with the effects specified.

  2. The improved waist belts, corsets, or equivalent garments or articles, set forth
respectively with reference to and shewn in the different figures of the drawings.

  Dated the 15th day of July 1892.

CHEESBROUGH & ROYSTON, Fels. Chart. Inst. P.A.,
15, Water Street, Liverpool, Applicant's Patent Agents.