CHAPTER XII.

THE "GRANDE" AIR.

GENERALLY speaking, women are theoretical without being practical.   They are superficial in their opinions, are apt to be severely critical or over-sympathetic, becoming extremists because they are not keen, practical observers of human nature.   Through this they have the reputation of being harsh in passing judgment on their own sex.   It is not because their nature is cruel, petty or uncharitable, but because one of the most important studies of life has been ignored.

Keeping the eyes open and the brain impressionable, making it a memoranda, is an education in itself.   Observation opens the gateways to everything that is noble, attainable and worth striving for. It gives one complete self-control, and a mastery over others.   Self possession, the "grande" air so necessary to the elegant woman, is soonest acquired by this habit of attention.   It teaches one to say something when talking, and gives the impression of reserved mental forces when silent.

To observe the must minute details in the every-day walks of life should be made as important a study and equally essential as is the alphabet. Attention is the key to success, and, if cultivated, the habit will soon become nature. It broadens the mind, makes one unselfish, noble, benevolent and polished in manner.   What more could one desire?   It will hold its own against all standards of beauty. Reluctantly I decide that "finis" should be added to the pages of this little book--to the book, and not to the subject.   All that I have left unsaid I leave to the womanhood and heart of the reader to finish for me.   If I have created even a slight interest, and awak ened self appreciation in the reader, my object is accomplished.